"Canaries of the Deep: The Plight of the Freshwater Mussel" Video Audubon Upper Mississippi River

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

 

What you should know:

 

Freshwater mussels are an important indicator species in the river’s ecosystem. In the late 1800's and early 1900's freshwater mussel shells were collected to make buttons. Raccoon, muskrat, and otter eat freshwater mussels, and mussels help clean the water in which they live. When a freshwater mussel eats it "breathes in" the water and filters out particles and tiny organisms in the water, leaving behind cleaner water. Though the domestic button industry is no longer a major industry, freshwater mussels are still harvested here and shipped overseas to the Asian market where they are used to “seed” oysters in the cultured pearl industry. Today, freshwater mussels are threatened by pollution, dams, dredging, and invader species like the zebra mussel and the Asian clam.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Fun With Freshwater Mussels

http://www.uvm.edu/~pass/tignor/mussels/index.htm

 

Freshwater Mussel Lesson Plan

http://www.sdafs.org/nongame/musselworkshop.pdf

 

Environmental Education for Kids (EEK) from Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/watercritter/mussel.htm

 

Buglopedia

http://www.bugsurvey.nsw.gov.au/html/popups/bpedia_14_tol_fr-mu.html

 

Missouri Botanical Gardens Aquatic Critters

http://mbgnet.mobot.org/fresh/slide/intro.htm

 

 

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Iowa Natural Resources Conservation Service

Christa Perkins

3002A Winegard Dr.

Burlington, IA 52601

(319)752-6395

christa.perkins@ia.usda.gov

 


"Wacipi Powwow" Video and Teacher's Guide

Click here to access the teacher's guide as a PDF
If It does not appear, you will probably need to install Acrobat Reader, available from the "Acrobat" folder on this disc. This document can also be accessed from the folder titled "Wicipi" on this disc.

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

NSS-G.K-12.4 HUMAN SYSTEMS

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

NL-ENG.K-12.1 READING FOR PERSPECTIVE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.2 UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

 

What you should know:

 

The Dakota people are some of the original people of the Upper Mississippi River Valley, and have a long and proud relationship to the river. Wacipi Powwow is a powerful documentary of the traditional Dakota gathering, a celebration of family, community and culture. In this video, members of the Dakota nation tell their own stories, sing their songs, dance traditional dances and offer an intimate look at deeply held values and beliefs. The video is colorful, joyous, and exciting to watch. The subjects on this video include:

 

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       What are the purposes of, and reasons for, the powwow?

·       How do you celebrate the kinds of things the Dakota celebrate in their powwow?

·       How are the beliefs and traditions of the Dakota similar to your traditions?

·       What are some of the struggles the Dakota have faced?

·       How are these struggles similar or different to the struggles you face?

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

KTCA’s web site supporting Wacipi Powwow, with information on many of the traditions explored in the video.

http://www.ktca.org/powwow/index.html

 

An online report from the Mahkato Mdewakanton Association on the background of the annual powwow in Mankato.

http://www.turtletrack.org/MahkatoWacipi/Press/July272002.htm

 

See also the Mahkato Mdewakanton Association’s page on Mahkato Education Day.

http://www.turtletrack.org/MahkatoWacipi/Education.htm

 

The Gathering of Nations Powwow web site

http://www.gatheringofnations.com/

 

Vendor Information

 

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

172 East Fourth Street

St. Paul, 55101

http://www.tpt.org

 


A Brief History of the Steamboat War Eagle

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

What you should know:

 

The Steamboat “War Eagle” was a sidewheel packet boat built in Cincinnati in 1853-1854. The War Eagle led the procession of boats in the original Excursion of 1854, carrying such distinguished passengers as former President Millard Fillmore. During the Civil War, the War Eagle was pressed into military service, as were many of the packet boats on the Mississippi River. The pamphlet was written and donated by Robert Taunt for the LaCrosse County Historical Society.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       How does a steam engine work?

·       What special design features allow steamboats to travel on shallow rivers without running aground?

·       What kinds of music were played on riverboats?

·       What kinds of goods were transported on riverboats?

·       Why were riverboats so important during the Civil War?

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Steamboats.com is a site dedicated to paddlewheel riverboats

http://www.steamboats.com

 

Online demonstration of how a steam engine works

http://twaintimes.net/boat/sbpage3a.htm

 

An incredible Steamboat web site from Germany

http://www.steamboats.org/

 

Steamboats.org offers an interactive tour of a virtual steamboat

http://www.steamboats.org/eexplore.htm

 

Vendor Information

 

LaCrosse Historical Society

Robert Taunt

608.785.9635

taunt.robert@lacrossecounty.org


A Thousand Friends of Frogs Activity Guide

 

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

What you should know:

 

Besides being a charismatic animal that naturally excites the interest and concern of students of all ages, frogs are a critical bio-indicator species. The health of frog populations gives us important information about the health of the ecosystems in which they live. At present, frog populations around the world are in decline, and the incidence of malformities is on the rise. Frog populations are threatened by habitat loss and degradation, loss of atmospheric ozone, disease, increase in pollution, and overuse of pesticides. This activity guide offers lesson plans to help your students understand the role of the frog in the ecosystem, and why it is such an important species.

 

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       What are the characteristics of frogs?

·       What does a frog eat, and what eats a frog?

·       What frogs live in your area?

·       Who in your area works with frog populations?

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

A Thousand Friends of Frogs

http://cgee.hamline.edu/frogs/

 

Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources Frog Pages

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/reptiles_amphibians/frogs_toads/saving.html

 

North American Amphibian Monitoring Program

http://www.im.nbs.gov/amphibs.html

 

Missouri Botanical Gardens Aquatic Critters

http://mbgnet.mobot.org/fresh/slide/intro.htm

 

An online article from Scientific American about frog deformities

http://www.sciam.com/print_version.cfm?articleID=000D5DCC-CA4A-1E1C-8B3B809EC588EEDF

Vendor Information

 

Center for Global Environmental Education

Hamline University

1536 Hewitt Ave. MS-A1760

St. Paul, MN 55104-1284

http://cgee.hamline.edu/

 


Big River Reader: An Anthology of Stories about the Upper Mississippi, from the First Four Years of Big River

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.1 READING FOR PERSPECTIVE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.2 UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

What you should know:

 

The Big River Reader is published by Big River, a magazine devoted to the “Upper Mississippi River, for people who live, work and play on the river.” This edition of the Big River Reader was reprinted especially for the River Exploration Trunks. The Big River magazine, and the stories in the Big River Reader, are gleaned from sources along the river between the Twin Cites and Davenport, IA, the same reach of the river that saw the boats in the original Excursion of 1854, and will see the 2004 Grand Flotilla. These stories offer a rich local context for information, story ideas, inquiry questions and native knowledge for teachers in schools all along the river.

 

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       What can you see, hear, smell, taste and feel along a river?

·       How do people use natural resources along the river where you live?

·       What kind of story could you write about a favorite character you know along the river?

·       Can you write a story about an adventure you have had along the river?

·       What are the most interesting animals, plants, occupations, people, or experiences you have seen along the river? Why?

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Big River Magazine’s web site

http://www.big-river.com/

 

National Geographic's annual conservation public-awareness campaign

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/geographyaction/

 

The Rivers of Life online “River Voices” Gallery, with stories from a wide variety of river authors, along with suggestions for student writing assignments

http://cgee.hamline.edu/rivers/Resources/Voices/toc.htm

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Big River Magazine

Reggie McLeod, Editor

111 Riverfront, Suite 204

P.O. Box 204

Winona, MN 55987

http://www.big-river.com/

Big River Journey Teacher’s Guide grades 4-6: MNRRA NPS

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.1 SCIENCE AS INQUIRY

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

 

What you should know:

 

The Big River Teacher’s Guide is a resource that supports the National Park Service’s (NPS) Big River Journey (BRJ), “an integration of river and classroom experiences that connect 4th-6th grade students with the science and heritage of the Mississippi River, and promotes stewardship.” BRJ is primarily a science-based program that includes connections to geography, history, art and more. The guide, donated to the River Exploration Trunks by the National Park Service, is full of science activities and resources to help you enrich your students’ investigations of the river.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       In what ways is the Mississippi River more thank just a ribbon of water?

·       How did the river get its name?

·       How long is the river, and why does the length change?

·       Why is the river so important to birds?

·       What factors threaten the health of the Mississippi River?

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

The National Park Service’s web site supporting the Big River Journey

http://www.nps.gov/miss/programs/brj/index.html

 

Wisconsin’s Environmental Education for Kids site

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/

 

Minnesota’s Interactive directory of environmental education resources

http://www.seek.state.mn.us

 

Iowa’s Environmental Education web site

http://www.iowaee.org/

 

Illinois DNR’s Environmental Education web site

http://www.dnr.state.il.us/entice/index.html

 

Vendor Information

 

Mississippi National River and Recreation Area

111 E Kellogg Blvd

St. Paul, MN 55101-1256

http://www.nps.gov/miss/programs/brj/index.html


River Stories II- Stories from Brian “Fox” Ellis

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.2 UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.4 COMMUNICATION SKILLS

 

NL-ENG.K-12.6 APPLYING KNOWLEDGE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.7 EVALUATING DATA

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NL-ENG.K-12.12 APPLYING LANGUAGE SKILLS

 

 

What you should know:

 

Brian “Fox” Ellis is an educational storyteller who blends the ancient forms of song and storytelling into an academic format. According to his web site, Ellis believes, “we are all storytellers. When we come home from a rough or good day and tell our family about our experience, we are enacting the ancient art of the story weaver. It is how we wrap our lives and bind them with others. One of my goals is to awaken the tale teller in all of us.”

 

River Stories 2 is, “A medley of song and story blends the diary of an old woman reminiscing about the glory days of the steamboat era interwoven with the writings of Mark Twain, including his first published story.  There is a string of tall tales, a ghost story, and a true story from the underground railroad, bestowing a multi-perspective picture of river history on the listener.”

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       Which of these stories are true, and which are “made up?” How can you tell the difference?

·       What kinds of tricks or techniques does the storyteller use to make his stories more interesting to listen to?

·       What elements does a good story have in it?

·       What kinds of experiences make good stories?

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Brian “Fox” Ellis’ web site, Fox Tales, International

http://www.foxtalesint.com/

 

Frequently asked questions about storytelling

http://www.timsheppard.co.uk/story/faq.html

 

Online guide to telling stories

http://www.storyteller.net/

 

Vendor Information

Brian “Fox” Ellis

http://www.foxtalesint.com/

foxtales@foxtalesint.com

 

 

Buttons of Native Mississippi River Mussels

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

NSS-EC.K-4.14 ENTREPRENEURS

 

What you should know:

 

The button on this card is from the Blumenthal Lansing Button Company, and is part of a cluster of resources about freshwater mussels and the button industry. The button industry was once one of the major industries in river towns south of Red Wing, and some of the button companies survive to this day. Freshwater mussels need clean water to survive. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s as St. Paul, MN grew, and the amount of raw sewage dumped into the river increased, freshwater mussel populations had a difficult time reproducing in the polluted waters south of the metropolitan area. Pollutants settled to the bottom of the river channel around the Red Wing area, and south of there, mussel populations thrived. The button, and the history of the company that makes the buttons are included to give your students an opportunity to touch a part of the living history of industry on the river.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       Who used these buttons?

·       Who collected the shells?

·       What was done with the “meat” of the mussels collected for buttons?

·       What do freshwater mussels need to survive?

·       What kinds of freshwater mussels live in your area?

·       Who in your community works with freshwater mussel populations?

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

History of John Boepple-Father of Muscatine's Pearl Button Industry

http://www.muscatine.k12.ia.us/was/History/pearlbuttons/contents.htm

 

Fun With Freshwater Mussels

http://www.uvm.edu/~pass/tignor/mussels/index.htm

 

Environmental Education for Kids (EEK) from Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/watercritter/mussel.htm

 

Buglopedia

http://www.bugsurvey.nsw.gov.au/html/popups/bpedia_14_tol_fr-mu.html

 

Vendor Information

 

Blumenthal Lansing Company

1929 Main Street, Lansing, IA 52151

http://buttonsplus.com/

Calls of Minnesota's Frogs & Toads (audio CD) from Minnesota Frog Watch

 

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

What you should know:

 

Besides being a charismatic animal that naturally excites the interest and concern of students of all ages, frogs are a critical bio-indicator species. The health of frog populations gives us important information about the health of the ecosystems in which they live. At present, frog populations around the world are in decline, and the incidence of malformities is on the rise. Frog populations are threatened by habitat loss and degradation, loss of atmospheric ozone, disease, increase in pollution, and overuse of pesticides. The CD, “Calls of Minnesota's Frogs & Toads” can help you and your students learn to identify different types of frog species by the calls they make. Volunteers in the MN Frog Watch, a citizen-monitoring network that annually surveys frog populations in MN, use this CD to learn to identify frogs by the sounds of their calls.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       What are the characteristics of frogs?

·       What does a frog eat, and what eats a frog?

·       What frogs live in your area?

·       Who in your area works with frog populations?

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

A Thousand Friends of Frogs

http://cgee.hamline.edu/frogs/

 

Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources Frog Pages

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/reptiles_amphibians/frogs_toads/saving.html

 

North American Amphibian Monitoring Program

http://www.im.nbs.gov/amphibs.html

 

Missouri Botanical Gardens Aquatic Critters

http://mbgnet.mobot.org/fresh/slide/intro.htm

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Center for Global Environmental Education

Hamline University

1536 Hewitt Ave. MS-A1760

St. Paul, MN 55104-1284

http://cgee.hamline.edu/

 


Discover a River

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NS.K-4.4 EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE

 

NS.K-4.1 SCIENCE AS INQUIRY

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

What you should know:

 

This book was generously donated to the River Exploration Trunks by Eastern National, which provides educational materials to more than 130 bookstores in the National Park Service.

 

According to their web site, “Discover a River is, “filled with activities about national river parks and their inhabitants. Educational activities include identifying wildlife and modes of transportation, examining river formations, preventing damage to ecosystems and learning about food chains.” This book can help educators introduce important basic concepts related to rivers and how the river system works. Though it is not specific to the Mississippi River, the concepts addressed in “Discover a River” are core to the study of every river.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       What kinds of wildlife live along your river?

·       How do people, animals and goods move along the river?

·       How are rivers formed, and how does a river form the land?

·       What kinds of damage can human activities cause along a river?

·       What is a food chain and where do people fit into it?

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

The National Park Service web site

http://www.nps.gov/

 

Mississippi National River & Recreation Area

http://www.nps.gov/miss/

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Eastern National

470 Maryland Drive, Suite 1

Fort Washington, PA 19034

http://www.eParks.com

 

 


 

Fresh Water Mussel Activity Book and Learning Resource USFW

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

What you should know:

 

This booklet, from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is part of a collection of resources on the freshwater mussel. Freshwater mussels are an important indicator species, thriving only in unpolluted waters. The health of freshwater mussel populations has much to tell us about the health of the river. Currently, pollution, dams, dredging, and invader species like the zebra mussel and the Asian clam threaten freshwater mussels.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       What are the characteristics of the freshwater mussel?

·       What is the role of the freshwater mussel in local ecosystems?

·       What is the role of the freshwater mussel in local food webs?

·       What species of freshwater mussels live in your area?

·       Who collected the mussel shells to make buttons?

·       What happened to the “meat” of the mussel after the shells were collected?

·       Who in your local community works with freshwater mussel populations?

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Fun With Freshwater Mussels

http://www.uvm.edu/~pass/tignor/mussels/index.htm

 

Freshwater Mussel Lesson Plan

http://www.sdafs.org/nongame/musselworkshop.pdf

 

Environmental Education for Kids (EEK) from Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/watercritter/mussel.htm

 

Buglopedia

http://www.bugsurvey.nsw.gov.au/html/popups/bpedia_14_tol_fr-mu.html

 

Missouri Botanical Gardens Aquatic Critters

http://mbgnet.mobot.org/fresh/slide/intro.htm

 

Vendor Information

 

Cynthia Samples

Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

51 E. 4th Street, Room 111

Winona, MN 55987


Here I Stand: Elder's Wisdom, Children's Songs, Guidebook and Audio CD

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NSS-USH.K-4.1 LIVING AND WORKING TOGETHER IN FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO

 

NA-M.K-4.4 COMPOSING AND ARRANGING MUSIC WITHIN SPECIFIED GUIDELINES

 

NA-M.K-4.8 UNDERSTANDING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MUSIC, THE OTHER ARTS, AND DISCIPLINES OUTSIDE THE ARTS

 

(Please note: In addition to the standards listed above, the guidebook lists other standards that might be addresses during the process of creating oral histories and songs.)

 

What you should know:

 

“Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song” is a guidebook that leads teachers and students through a “collective songwriting” process that honors the work of elders in your community. The project combines oral history and interviewing skills with poetry and songwriting. Larry Long’s extensive work with community organizing, peacemaking and honoring elders comes together in this detailed, integrated guide.

 

The steps of the process are outlined, activities are articulated clearly, and outcomes are aligned with national education standards in the areas of history, geography, Music/Arts, Language Arts, and others. There are tips for interviewing, an interview checklist, an evaluation, and samples of songs and interviews by others. The audio CD included with this resource is full of songs written and performed by students in Alabama, where the “Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song” project was piloted. These songs can serve as examples and models for your students as they honor the work of elders in their own communities.

 

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       Note: Questions for use with this resource are included in the guidebook.

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Larry Long’s web site

http://larrylong.org/

 

Community Celebration of Place, the non-profit community site Larry Long founded and directs

http://www.communitycelebration.org/

 

Teaching Tolerance web site, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center

http://www.tolerance.org/teach/

 

Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

http://www.folkways.si.edu

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Larry Long

Community Celebration of Place

PO Box 581601

Minneapolis, MN 55458-1601

http://larrylong.org/

 


Ininatig's Gift of SUGAR: Traditional Native Sugarmaking

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NL-ENG.K-12.2 UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.1 READING FOR PERSPECTIVE

 

NSS-USH.K-4.1 LIVING AND WORKING TOGETHER IN FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

What you should know:

 

“Ininatig’s Gift of Sugar” tells the story of the sugarmaking tradition of the Anishinabe nation. Written from an insider’s perspective, the story tells not only the process of making maple sugar and syrup, but the beliefs and values of the Anishinabe people. “Ininatig’s Gift of Sugar” offers many opportunities for deeper inquiry into the relationship the Anishinabe have with the natural world. One sugarmaker, a tribal elder named Porky White, is profiled, making “Ininatig’s Gift of Sugar” a wonderful complement to the “Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song” guidebook.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       How do the Anishinable know it’s time to begin tapping the trees?

·       How do young people learn to make sugar?

·       How does the sap from sugar maples become maple syrup, candy and sugar?

·       Can you make sugar from any other kinds of trees?

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Backyard sugarmaking instructions, from the University of Vermont Extension

http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmaple/backyardmaple.htm

 

Maple sugar making at the Audubon Center of the North Woods, in Sandstone, MN

http://www.audubon-center.com/Maple_syruping.htm

 

A lesson plan from Green’s Sugar Bush, one of Iowa’s oldest continuously operating industries

http://silosandsmokestacks.org/resources/FieldTripGuide/Winneshiek/greens_sugar_bush.htm

 

The seasons of the Ojibway, from the Iniverity of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

http://www.uwec.edu/greider/Indigenous/Woodlands/Odawa/seasons_of_the_ojibwe.htm

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Lerner Publications

1251 Washington Avenue North

Minneapolis, MN 55401

http://lernerbooks.com


 

I Will Be Your Friend: Songs and Activities for Young Peacemakers

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NL-ENG.K-12.2 UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

 

NSS-USH.K-4.1 LIVING AND WORKING TOGETHER IN FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO

 

NA-M.K-4.4 COMPOSING AND ARRANGING MUSIC WITHIN SPECIFIED GUIDELINES

 

NA-M.K-4.8 UNDERSTANDING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MUSIC, THE OTHER ARTS, AND DISCIPLINES OUTSIDE THE ARTS

 

What you should know:

 

What is a CD full of songs about peacemaking, friendship and understanding doing in a trunk full of resources about the river? Filling a critical niche.

 

Environmental literacy means understanding the interactions between natural and social systems. It is widely understood by science and environmental educators that diversity within a system is a positive attribute; it makes that system stronger and more stable. This principle holds true in both natural systems, i.e., ecosystems, watersheds, and others, and in social systems like schools, neighborhoods, cities, and nations.

 

“I Will Be Your Friend” uses the universal, joyful language of music to encourage peacemaking among students of different cultural backgrounds and traditions. As our population increases and competition for resources like water becomes more intense, our next generation of river stewards will need peacemaking skills to help them negotiate solutions to increasingly urgent environmental issues.

 

Many of the cultural resources in your trunk highlight the strained and often violent relationships between Native American and European/American nations. “I Will Be Your Friend” offers students a clear, positive alternative. This resource was generously donated by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       How do different cultures name their children? What does your name mean?

·       Many songs are about giving thanks. What are some things for which you are thankful?

·       There are many languages in the world. Can you discover how different languages say “hello,” “friend,” “welcome,” “river,” and “peace?”

·       What are different ways to make a new friend?

·       What are some ways to be a better friend to our earth- our rivers, animals, plants, and other peoples?

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

The Southern Poverty Law Center’s “Teaching tolerance” web site for teachers

http://www.tolerance.org/teach/index.jsp

 

The 1000 Cranes Club, an international peacemaking activity for students, based on the true story of Sadako Sasaki, a survivor of the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima, Japan

http://www.hiroshima-is.ac.jp/Hiroshima/crane.htm

 

Peace Education Resources for teachers

http://www.sofweb.vic.edu.au/lem/multi/mpeace.htm#PER

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Southern Poverty Law Center

400 Washington Ave.

Montgomery, AL 36104

http://www.splcenter.org/


 

Jane Gibbs: "Little Bird That Was Caught"

 

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NL-ENG.K-12.2 UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

 

NSS-USH.K-4.1 LIVING AND WORKING TOGETHER IN FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO

 

NL-ENG.K-12.1 READING FOR PERSPECTIVE

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

 

What you should know:

 

“Jane Gibbs, The Little bird That Was Caught” is the true story of a girl who lived many years ago. Jane was taken from her family, traveled hundreds of miles to a wilderness, and raised in a Dakota village on the shores of what we now call Lake Harriet, in Minneapolis. She learned to speak two languages, was raised in two sets of traditions, under two very different sets of rules.

 

Jane Gibbs’ story offers insights into early relationships between white missionaries and their culture, and the culture of the Dakota in Minnesota.

 

Questions to ask:

 

·       How would it feel to be so far from your home and family, as Jane was?

·       Jane grew up learning two very different sets of rules, traditions, games, and languages. What kinds of rules did she have to learn, and how are they similar to the rules you have to learn?

·       What kinds of games did Jane play in her two worlds?

·       What were some of the challenges and obstacles Jane and her families had to overcome?

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Ramsey County Historical Society’s web site on the Gibb’s Farm Museum of pioneer and Dakota life. Excellent site, highly recommended

http://www.rchs.com/gbbsfm2.htm

 

PBS site for “Painting the Dakota”, a film about artist and military officer Seth Eastman's life and the traditions of the Dakota he painted.

http://www.pbs.org/ktca/setheastman/

 

An online multimedia project from Dakota Meadows Middle School, Mankato, MN, about the Dakota Conflict of 1862

http://www.isd77.k12.mn.us/schools/dakota/conflict/history.htm

 

Vendor Information

 

Ramsey County Historical Society

323 Landmark Center

75 West Fifth Street

Saint Paul, Minnesota. 55102

http://rchs.com/


 

Mahkato Wacipi- Audio CD

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NSS-USH.K-4.1 LIVING AND WORKING TOGETHER IN FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO

 

NA-M.K-4.4 COMPOSING AND ARRANGING MUSIC WITHIN SPECIFIED GUIDELINES

 

NA-M.K-4.8 UNDERSTANDING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MUSIC, THE OTHER ARTS, AND DISCIPLINES OUTSIDE THE ARTS

 

 

What you should know:

 

 

This audio CD is a recording of the songs, dances and stories of a two-day Wacipi, or powwow, held in Southern Minnesota; an event of forgiveness and reconciliation. In 1862, at the height of the Dakota Conflict, 38 men were hanged by representatives of the U.S. government. The two-day powwow, held as part of the 1987 Year of Reconciliation, marked a turning away from animosity, to a healing process between cultures. This recording commemorates this important event in modern relations between the Dakota and the American nations.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

 

The web site of the Mahkato Mdewakanton Association, honoring the 38 Dakota executed

http://www.turtletrack.org/MahkatoWacipi/index.htm

 

Web site for “From the Top,” dedicated to young classical musicians.

http://www.fromthetop.org/default.html

 

An online multimedia project from Dakota Meadows Middle School, Mankato, MN, about the Dakota Conflict of 1862

http://www.isd77.k12.mn.us/schools/dakota/conflict/history.htm

 

Learn more about Charles Eastman, a Dakota whose family was killed in the great conflict of 1862

http://www.worldwisdom.com/Public/SlideShows/SlideShow.asp?SlideShowID=3&SlideDetailID=3

 

Vendor Information

 

American Composer Forum

332 Minnesota Street E-145

Saint Paul, MN 55101

http://www.innova.mu


 

Minn of the Mississippi

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.1 READING FOR PERSPECTIVE

 

NSS-G.K-12.2 PLACES AND REGIONS

 

NSS-G.K-12.3 PHYSICAL SYSTEMS

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

NSS-G.K-12.6 THE USES OF GEOGRAPHY

 

What you should know:

 

“Minn of the Mississippi” is a classic book about the river. As Minn, the three-legged turtle, journeys down the river, the book offers an opportunity to teach geography through literature, life sciences, human impact on the environment, and many other concepts. Because there is so much information in the book, it might be best utilized as a read-aloud book, with lots of discussions to check for understanding.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Read Aloud Lesson Plan

http://kancrn.kckps.k12.ks.us/read_alouds/ss/minn.htm

 

Supplemental Internet Sites for use with the books of Holling C. Holling (Scroll down the page to find Minn of the Mississippi.

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Grove/6932/holling.html

 

Online MapMachine from National Geographic

http://plasma.nationalgeographic.com/mapmachine/

 

Vendor Information

 

Houghton Mifflin

222 Berkeley Street

Boston, MA 02116-3764

http://www.hmco.com/


 

Mississippi River Brochure and Trail Guide - Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (MNRRA) of the National Park Service (NPS)

 

These resources can be used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-G.K-12.1 THE WORLD IN SPATIAL TERMS

 

NSS-G.K-12.2 PLACES AND REGIONS

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

NSS-G.K-12.6 THE USES OF GEOGRAPHY

 

What you should know:

 

The Mississippi River Brochure and the Trail Guide of the Minneapolis/Saint Paul Area are easy-to-use, compact references that describe the trails and roads running through the nationally significant gorge area of the Upper Mississippi River.

 

MNRRA is a unique in the National Park system. The Mississippi River Brochure illustrates the fact that the Recreation Area has no definitive boundaries, but is a patchwork of public and private lands along a 72-mile stretch of river. The Trail Guide offers a section-by-section tour of the area on both sides of the river.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

The Mississippi National River and Recreation Area web site

http://www.nps.gov/miss/

 

Audubon’s Upper Mississippi River Campaign web site

http://www.audubon.org/campaign/umr/

 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s “Surf Your Watershed” site

http://www.epa.gov/surf/

 

Vendor Information

 

Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (MNRRA)

111 E Kellogg Blvd

St. Paul, MN 55101-1256

http://www.nps.gov/miss/

Mississippi National River and Recreation Area of the National Park Service Posters (MNRRA NPS Posters)

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-G.K-12.1 THE WORLD IN SPATIAL TERMS

 

NSS-G.K-12.2 PLACES AND REGIONS

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

NSS-G.K-12.6 THE USES OF GEOGRAPHY

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

What you should know:

 

The large, colorful posters can be used in conjunction with several other resources in your trunk. Published by the National Park Service, the posters are large, easy-to-read and offer a visual tool to enhance your exploration of the history of the river. Each of the four posters in the set looks at a different part of the river system- the ecosystem, the cultural history and the industry of the area. Use the posters as exemplars for student assessment, to add visual interest to your classroom, or as resources for a scavenger hunt.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

The Mississippi National River and Recreation Area web site- maps section

http://www.nps.gov/miss/maps/index.html

 

A short history of Little Crow, of the Kaposia band, written by his son, Ohiyesa, (Charles Eastman)

http://www.indigenouspeople.net/littcrow.htm

 

History of Lambert’s Landing, from the MNRRA web site

http://www.nps.gov/miss/maps/model/lambert.html

 

History of Fountain Cave, from the MNRRA web site

http://www.nps.gov/miss/maps/model/fountain.html

 

Mississippi River history from the Padelford Packet Boat Co.

http://www.riverrides.com/pages/About_Us/about_riverhistory.html

 

Vendor Information

 

Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (MNRRA)

111 E Kellogg Blvd

St. Paul, MN 55101-1256

http://www.nps.gov/miss/


Muscatine, Iowa Shells in a Bag

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

What you should know:

 

This sample of a mussel shell midden is part of a broad collection of resources on the freshwater mussel. The cooperative, volunteer efforts of many people from river towns between Lansing, IA and Muscatine, IA were tapped in order to locate and gather the shells included in your trunk. While once these shells lined the riverbanks, serving as a reminder of the once thriving button industry, the shells have become much more rare. Redevelopment efforts in towns along the Mississippi have buried or crushed most of these shells. Because these are river artifacts, there is no vendor listed.

 

The button industry was once a major part of the economy of many towns along the river. The shells you have demonstrate how buttons blanks were cut out of the mussel shells. Freshwater mussels are an important indicator species, thriving only in unpolluted waters. The health of freshwater mussel populations has much to tell us about the health of the river. Currently, pollution, dams, dredging, and invader species like the zebra mussel and the Asian clam threaten freshwater mussels.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Fun With Freshwater Mussels

http://www.uvm.edu/~pass/tignor/mussels/index.htm

 

Freshwater Mussel Lesson Plan

http://www.sdafs.org/nongame/musselworkshop.pdf

 

Environmental Education for Kids (EEK) from Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/critter/watercritter/mussel.htm

 

Buglopedia

http://www.bugsurvey.nsw.gov.au/html/popups/bpedia_14_tol_fr-mu.html

 

History of Muscatine’s Pearl Button Industry

http://www.muscatine.k12.ia.us/was/History/pearlbuttons/contents.htm

 


Ojibway Music From Minnesota: A Century of Song for Voice and Drum

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NA-M.K-4.6 LISTENING TO, ANALYZING, AND DESCRIBING MUSIC

 

NA-M.K-4.9 UNDERSTANDING MUSIC IN RELATION TO HISTORY AND CULTURE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

What you should know:

 

Music is an important part of every culture, and the Ojibway is no exception. To European ears, Ojibway music might sound unfamiliar, but the songs are complex, distinctive and evocative. Because music is such an important part of our relationship to rivers, the music of the Ojibway is one of a collection of audio CDs that capture early music, and trace the development of Ojibway songs over time.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Turtle Island Productions music web site

http://www.turtle-island.com/music.html

 

PBS’ “River of Song” web site, featuring articles about river music, and the music itself, including music from the Ojibway

http://www.pbs.org/riverofsong/music/e1-articles.html

 

Online listing of Native American Music, from Swarthmore College

http://www.swarthmore.edu/Library/underhill/Music/natives.html

 

Online publication exploring traditions of Native powwows, from the University of Illinois Press

http://www.press.uillinois.edu/epub/books/browner/ch1.html

 

Vendor Information

 

Minnesota Historical Society Press

345 Kellogg Blvd. West

St. Paul, Minnesota 55102-1906

http://www.mnhs.org/market/mhspress/0132.html

River EcoJourneys: An Art and Science Curriculum to Promote Watershed Stewardship for Grades 3-6

 

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

Please note: The lesson plans in this curriculum were aligned to MN education standards. In 2003, those state standards changed.)

 

NA-VA.K-4.1 UNDERSTANDING AND APPLYING MEDIA, TECHNIQUES, AND PROCESSES

 

NA-VA.K-4.2 USING KNOWLEDGE OF STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS

 

NA-VA.K-4.3 CHOOSING AND EVALUATING A RANGE OF SUBJECT MATTER, SYMBOLS, AND IDEAS

 

NA-VA.K-4.4 UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL ARTS IN RELATION TO HISTORY AND CULTURES

 

NA-VA.K-4.5 REFLECTING UPON AND ASSESSING THE CHARACTERISTICS AND MERITS OF THEIR WORK AND THE WORK OF OTHERS

 

NA-VA.K-4.6 MAKING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN VISUAL ARTS AND OTHER DISCIPLINES

 

NS.K-4.1 SCIENCE AS INQUIRY

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NS.K-4.5 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

NS.K-4.7 HISTORY OF NATURE AND SCIENCE:

 

What you should know:

 

River EcoJourneys is an interdisciplinary curriculum that brings art and science together. It is designed to help students learn to better care for their local environments, connect to their watershed, and understand how human actions can impact environmental quality for people and wildlife.

 

ArtStart, a St. Paul non-profit organization that uses the arts to teach environmental literacy, publishes the curriculum. By tapping students’ creativity, the curriculum encourages students to learn more and do more to make their environment healthy and sustainable.

 

Questions to ask:

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

 

ArtStart, the publisher of the River EcoJourneys curriculum

http://artstart.org/

 

MNRRA Big River Journey Art Gallery

http://www.nps.gov/miss/programs/brj/gallery.html

 

The Environmental Art and Poetry Gallery from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

http://www.niehs.nih.gov/kids/gallery.htm

 

Greenmuseum.org, a nonprofit, online museum of environmental art

http://greenmuseum.org/

 

 

Vendor Information

ArtStart

1459 St. Clair

St. Paul, 55105

http://artstart.org/

Surf the Nest CD ROM on Eagles

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NS.K-4.5 SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

What you should know:

 

This CD-ROM is an interactive technology product that explores the life cycle of the bald eagle. It is especially good for young readers. Though much of the CD-ROM is text-based, all of the text is read aloud on the CD, making it easy for less-proficient readers to follow.

 

The CD is divided into stages in an eagle’s life, and traces the life cycle of this national icon from egg to adult. This resource was donated by the organization that funded the production, the Modern Woodmen of America Insurance Company.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

National Eagle Center

http://www.eaglewatch.org/welcome.html

 

American Bald Eagle Information

http://www.baldeagleinfo.com/

 

The Raptor Center of the University of Minnesota

http://www.raptor.cvm.umn.edu/

 

Live Online Eagle-Cam

http://www.wa.gov/wdfw/wildwatch/eaglecam/index.html

 

Northeast Utilities System- Eagle Information, Video clips, Sounds, Photographs, etc.

http://www.nu.com/eagles/default.asp

 

Vendor Information

 

Modern Woodmen of America

1701 1st Avenue

P.O. Box 2005

Rock Island, IL 61204-2005

http://www.modern-woodmen.org/

The Good Path - Ojibwe Learning and Activity Book for Kids

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NSS-USH.K-4.1 LIVING AND WORKING TOGETHER IN FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO

 

What you should know:

 

“The Good Path” is a beautifully written book that looks at Ojibwe culture, history, traditions, and most interestingly, the value system that guides traditional Ojibwe life. Written from the Ojibwe world-view, the authors explain in the introduction that stories told in the oral tradition reflect the storytellers influence. Rather than refer to these stories and “myths” or “legends” the ojibwe believe each of the stories told represent a fraction of the truth.

 

“The Good Path” is part of a collection of resources in your trunk that explore the historical and cultural connections to the river, and encourage students to look at cultural diversity and biodiversity as positive attributes of natural and human systems.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Ojibway Culture, from the Turtle Island Anishinabe

http://www.turtle-island.com/ojibculture.html

 

Legends and short stories from the Lake of the Woods Ojibway Cultural Centre

http://www.schoolnet.ca/aboriginal/kenora/index-e.html

 

An Ojibway History

http://www.runningdeerslonghouse.com/webdoc220.htm

 

Waswagoning - Recreated Ojibway Village

http://www.waswagoning.com/

 

Stories and poems of the Ojibway

http://www.indians.org/welker/chippewa.htm

 

Vendor Information

 

Afton Historical Society Press

PO Box 100; Afton, MN 55001

http://aftonpress.com/


 

The Sacred Harvest Ojibway Wild Rice Gathering

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NL-ENG.K-12.2 UNDERSTANDING THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.1 READING FOR PERSPECTIVE

 

NL-ENG.K-12.9 MULTICULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

 

NSS-USH.K-4.2 THE HISTORY OF STUDENTS' OWN STATE OR REGION

 

What you should know:

 

The tradition of gathering wild rice is more than a means of getting food; wild rice is considered to be a sacred gift to the Ojibway people from the Creator. In this book, a young boy goes with his father for his first harvest, to learn the methods of gathering the wild rice, and the stories his people tell of the gift that makes survival possible in the cold northern lands of Minnesota.

 

This book is all about relationships- the relationship the Ojibway have with the natural world, the relationship between the generations of a family, and the relationship between time-honored tradition and the modern world.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Minnesota Wild Rice Management Planning Project

http://www.minnesotawildrice.org/

 

Food and recipes from Nativetech: Native American Technology and Art

http://www.nativetech.org/food/

 

Tools and resources from the Ojibway Language Society

http://www.ojibwemowin.com/aabajichigan.html

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Lerner Publications

1251 Washington Avenue North

Minneapolis, MN 55401

http://lernerbooks.com


 

Science Museum of Minnesota Topographical and Aerial Maps

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-G.K-12.1 THE WORLD IN SPATIAL TERMS

 

NSS-G.K-12.2 PLACES AND REGIONS

 

NSS-G.K-12.3 PHYSICAL SYSTEMS

 

NSS-G.K-12.4 HUMAN SYSTEMS

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

NSS-G.K-12.6 THE USES OF GEOGRAPHY

 

What you should know:

 

The Science Museum of Minnesota has created these custom maps for each of the schools receiving a trunk from the Grand Excursion, Inc. Using data from the U.S Geological Survey, provided by the Dept. of Natural Resources in each of the four states participating in the Grand Excursion, the maps show the area around each school in both topographical and aerial views.

 

The aerial photography dates from 1991. Schools built after 1991 will not appear on the maps, but you should be able to find the location of your school building and any buildings that surround it that were constructed prior to 1991.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

Science Museum of Minnesota

http://www.smm.org/

 

Online aerial and satellite photography

http://terraserver-usa.com/

 

USGS site on reading topographical maps

http://mac.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/booklets/symbols/

 

Vendor Information

 

Science Museum of Minnesota

120 W Kellogg Boulevard

St. Paul, MN 55102

http://www.smm.org/

 


Understanding Invasive Aquatic Weeds

 

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

NS.K-4.3 LIFE SCIENCE

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

 

What you should know:

 

This activity book from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service details the invasive weeds that threaten the Upper Mississippi River ecosystem. The activities are targeted for 5th grade level, but because the information is pertinent and accessible for students in higher grade levels, it is included in your middle school trunk.

 

The Mississippi River is used by a variety of interests, including as a highway for barge traffic, a recreational waterway by boaters, and as a flyway for a majority of North American bird species. All of these users could potentially introduce exotic species to the fragile ecosystem. Understanding the treat that exotic species pose is essential to fostering stewardship in citizens.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Educating for Conservation web site

http://educators.fws.gov/

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Education pages on invasive plant species

http://educators.fws.gov/E_plants.html

 

Online version of the booklet, from the Aquatic Plant Management Society

http://www.apms.org/book/activity.htm

 

Discussion of invasive species from the Ecological Society of America

http://esa.sdsc.edu/invas3.htm

 

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Cynthia Samples

Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

51 E. 4th Street, Room 111

Winona, MN 55987

 


Water Resources Education Poster Series: USGS and USACOE

 

 

What you should know:

 

This poster is one of a series of nine posters, created to introduce the following water-related topics: Oceans, Watersheds, Hazardous Waste, Wetlands, Water Use, Wastewater Treatment, Navigation, Ground Water and Water Quality. Your trunk includes one of these nine posters. Each poster can be used to introduce or address a wide variety of standards and discipline areas.

 

The posters are available at no charge from the USGS, and the U.S. Environmental Protection agency. To order the other posters in this series, see Vendor Information, below.

 

On the back of each poster is additional information for teachers on related topics, tidbits of content information and background on the issue depicted on the poster, questions to explore, and possible actions to take to address the concerns connected to each issue. The posters are a fun, colorful way to engage students’ interest in a water-related topic, and focus a deeper inquiry.

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

U.S. Geological Survey’s education web site

http://www.usgs.gov/education/index.html

 

Water curriculum resources from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

http://www.epa.gov/teachers/curriculumwater.htm

 

 

Vendor Information

 

U.S. Geological Survey

Branch of Information Services

Box 25286

Denver Federal Center

Denver, CO 80225

Phone- 1-888-ASK-USGS


 

Wastewater Treatment for Youngsters 8-80 (K-12)

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NS.K-4.6 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL PERSPECTIVES

 

NSS-G.K-12.5 ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY

 

What you should know:

 

The Metropolitan Council publishes this CD-ROM. According to their web site, “Wastewater Treatment for Youngsters provides a simplified look at wastewater treatment and is designed to give the viewer a general idea of how the process works. In addition, it is our hope that the viewer will gain a greater understanding of how wastewater treatment relates to water resource management.”

 

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

 

Online version of the CD-ROM, from the Metropolitan Council

http://www.metrocouncil.org/environment/Kids/index.htm

 

Wastewater treatment education tools from the Water Environment Federation

http://www.wef.org/publicinfo/interactive.jhtml

 

 

Vendor Information

 

Metropolitan Council Environmental Services

Metro Environment Education Center
6th floor, Mears Park Building
230 East 5th St.,
St. Paul, MN

http://www.metrocouncil.org/environment/environment.htm


 

 

Water Safety Adventure Activity Book USACOE

 

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

NPH.K-12.5 RESPONSIBLE BEHAVIOR

 

NPH.K-12.7 UNDERSTANDING CHALLENGE

 

NPH.K-12.3 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

 

What you should know:

 

Rivers attract us for many reasons, among them recreation. We swim, we fish, go boating, and often, get in trouble. This activity book from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is a fun, easy to use tool for opening a discussion of safe behaviors around and in the water. It is especially good for students who learn spatially.

 

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

National Water Safety Program from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

http://watersafety.usace.army.mil/

 

Water safety tips from the American Red Cross

http://www.redcross.org/services/hss/tips/healthtips/safetywater.html

 

Water safety program from down under- Australia’s water safety program

http://www.watersafety.vic.gov.au/web/wsv/watersafetysite.nsf/pages/waterhome

 

 

Vendor Information

 

US Army Corps of Engineers

Sibley Bldg.

190 E. Fifth St.

St. Paul, MN 55101

http://watersafety.usace.army.mil/

 

 

WEF: The Water Sourcebook: A Series of Classroom Activities for Grades 3-5 printed

 

This resource can used to address the following National Education Standards:

 

Please note: Each of the 60 different activities in the Water Sourcebook for grades 3-5 is correlated to multiple national education standards in the areas of math, science, language arts, social studies and the arts. To see the correlation chart, go to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s site at:

http://www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/wsb/35corr.pdf

 

 

What you should know:

The Water Sourcebooks are a co-production of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Water Environment Federation. Along with an introduction to general concepts about water, these guides for educators offer grade-level appropriate lessons and activities in the areas of Drinking and Wastewater Treatment, Surface Water, Groundwater, Wetlands and Coastal waters, correlations to nationals education standards, and fact sheets about water.

The lessons focus on “the water management cycle using a balanced approach showing how it affects all aspects of the environment.” The Water Sourcebooks are also available online. See below for the web site URL.

Questions to ask:

 

 

 

Suggested Web Sites:

 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s web site for the Water Sourcebooks

http://www.epa.gov/safewater/kids/wsb/

 

The Water Environment Federation’s education web site

http://wef.org/education/

 

Vendor Information

 

Water Environment Federation

601 Wythe Street

Alexandria, VA 22314-1994

http://www.wef.org/